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Three peculiar new genera of lebiine carabid beetles from Queensland, Australia (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae: Lebiini)

Title Three peculiar new genera of lebiine carabid beetles from Queensland, Australia (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae: Lebiini) (788 KB) pdf document icon
Author/s Baehr, M.
Citation Baehr, M. 2012 02 17: Three peculiar new genera of lebiine carabid beetles from Queensland, Australia (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae: Lebiini). Memoirs of the Queensland Museum – Nature 56(1): 99-115. https://doi.org/10.17082/j.2204-1478.56-1.2012.2012-09
Accepted 29 April 2011
Date published 17 February 2012
DOI

https://doi.org/10.17082/j.2204-1478.56-1.2012.2012-09

Keywords Coleoptera, Carabidae, Lebiini, Anomotariella, Geoffreyella, Australovelinda, new genera, new species, Australia
Abstract
Three new genera and four species of the carabid tribe Lebiini are described from eastern Queensland, Australia: Anomotariella gen. nov. with the species A. hippocrepis sp. nov.; Geoffreyella gen. nov. with the species G. holoserica sp. nov. and G. lamingtonensis sp. nov.; and Australovelinda gen. nov. with the species A. seriata sp. nov. The wide, explanate mandibles, presence of a wide mental tooth, denticulate tarsal claws, slightly widened labial palpi, and the narrow, elongate, and parallel-sided gonocoxite 2 place Anomotariella in the subtribe Anomotarina (=Calleidina), but in body shape and in the setosity of the female gonocoxite 2 it is quite distinct from all described Oriental-Australian genera of the subtribe. The structure of the ligula, the female gonocoxite 2, and the male aedeagus place the genus Geoffreyella in the lebiine subtribe Dromiina, but it is very peculiar within this group because of the atypical, dense, depressed pilosity on the whole body. The setosity of the female gonocoxite 2 is also unusual within the subtribe, although its shape is dromiine-like. Although the female genitalia of Australovelinda are not yet known, the body shape, structure of the mouth parts, and structure of the dorsal surface demonstrate that this genus belongs to the small tribe Lichnasthenina which has not previously been recorded from Australia and was known from only southern Africa, Madagascar and India. Their peculiar body shapes and colour patterns make all the new genera easily identified among the Australian lebiines. Anomotariella and Geoffreyella apparently do not possess close relatives within their respective subtribes.